[ Generalna ] 23 Maj, 2019 08:29
Organic matter improves soil as a growing medium for plants. It helps release nitrogen, minerals, and other nutrients for plant use when it decays. A mulch of partially rotted straw, compost, or undecomposed crop residue on the soil helps keep the soil surface from crusting, retards water loss from the soil, and keeps weeds from growing.Practically any plant material can be composted for use in the garden. Leaves, old sod, lawn clippings, straw, and plant refuse from the garden or kitchen can be used. Often, leaves can be obtained from neighbors who do not use them or from street sweepings.

The purpose of composting plant refuse or debris is to decay it so that it can be easily worked into the soil and will not be unsightly when used in the garden. Composting material should be kept moist and supplied with commercial fertilizer, particularly nitrogen, to make it decay faster and more thoroughly.

The usual practice in building a compost pile is to accumulate the organic material in some out-of-the-way place in the garden. It can be built on open ground or in a bin made of cinder blocks, rough boards, or wire fence. The sides of the bin should not be airtight or watertight. A convenient time to make a compost pile is in vegetarian capsules the fall when leaves are plentiful.

In building the compost pile, spread out a layer of plant refuse about 6 inches deep and add one-half pound or one cupful of 10-10-10, 10-20-10, or 10-6-4 fertilizer to each 10 square feet of surface. Then add 1 inch of soil and enough water to moisten but not soak it. This process is repeated until the pile is 4 to 5 feet high. Make the top of the pile concave to catch rainwater.

If alkaline compost is wanted, ground limestone can be spread in the pile at the same rate as the fertilizer.
The compost pile will not decay rapidly until the weather warms up in spring and summer. In midsummer, decay can be hastened by forking over the pile so moisture can get to parts that have remained dry. The compost should be ready for use by the end of the first summer.

For a continuing supply of compost, a new pile should be built every year. Compost can be used as a mulch, or worked into flower beds and the vegetable garden. 

When properly prepared and thoroughly decayed, compost is not likely to harbor diseases or insects. If the compost is used in soil where an attempt is made to control plant diseases, or if it is mixed with soil used for raising seedlings, the soil should be disinfected with chemicals recommended by your local Extension agent or State agricultural college.
[ Generalna ] 15 Maj, 2019 08:18

​For those who have started a vegetable garden, you may be pleased by the fruits of your labor. However, you should note that disease is a common hot spot to be on the look out for. You need to have HPMC capsules a level of control over possible diseases to keep your vegetables healthy.There are a few tips that will help you.

With any type of gardening, it all begins with good soil preparation and choosing the right seeds. Choose the hardiest looking vegetable when transplanting. If you are quick about getting rid of the affected vegetables, it will reduce harm to other plants.

Proper watering practices will help as well. You should give the plants moisture early to allow them time to dry before the sun sets. It would be helpful to your vegetables to water them with care. If a plant is diseased, and water splashes from it to another plant, it could spread that disease. Just use the analogy of how colds are passed from one individual to the next. Ensuring that there is proper distance between vegetables can help with this.

Diseases are transferable between plants. Some diseases are transmitted via insects so it is important to keep a check on them. Humans and animals carry a level of danger by passing diseases to your vegetables too. Tobacco mosaic virus is an example and it is transmitted through animals that venture through your vegetable plot or even from contact with your garden gloves.

Maintaining a tight check on weeds will help to lower the chances of diseases. It makes your garden look nicer while keeping it healthy. Different types of microbes can be transferred from the weeds to your vegetable plot. They are also transferable via other medium such as air, water and living organisms like bugs.

Knowing which diseases to look for on certain plants will give you a head start.

When you notice that there is a damp, rotting spot at the base of the lettuce where it meets the ground, that is lettuce mold. The white mold is called Sclerotinia, and the gray is Botrytis. Cut away diseased portions however, if the disease has spread to large areas, removal of the entire plant is advised.

Lettuce is also prone to the spinach mosaic virus. They begin by showing blotchy leaves that yellow over time. It begins to look limp and will droop. Some varieties are more resistant to this disease than others, so keep that in mind.

Wilting or rotting of asparagus may be caused by something called Fusarium. The shoots start to yellow and the spears that appear look think and weak. Discolored and rotted roots may also show up. Remove the affected plants as necessary. The Puccinia fungus will cause another problem with asparagus called rust. This problem will result in reddish spots appearing on the shoots and spears. Excess watering is sometimes the cause of this.

Blight and leaf spots commonly affect tomatoes. Especially in cool summers, these diseases will usually show up by mid August. Tomatoes are affected by soil fungi. The roots of walnut trees sometimes carry a toxin that is potentially dangerous to nearby tomatoes. Making sure the leaves are dry before nightfall will help reduce this.

Being aware of the signs and symptoms and methods to steer clear of such troubles can allow you to produce beautiful vegetables come harvest time.

[ Generalna ] 28 April, 2019 08:38
It's never too early to begin planning next summer's vegetable garden.  In fact, sales of greenhouses and seed starting supplies usually begin in late December and early January, and by the end of February, most retailers have a variety of seeds for sale on store shelves.  If you want to plant a vegetable garden this coming summer, some advance planning will ensure that you are able to get all the seeds you want before they sell out, and you'll be able to start them in time to have healthy young plants ready for transplant into your garden in early or late spring.

The first part of planning your vegetable garden is deciding what to grow.  How much space do you have for planting?  Someone who lives in the country and has a large plot of land will certainly need to do more advance planning than an apartment dweller with a small deck or veranda.  Remember that even if you're limited by space, there are many types of vegetables that grow well in patio containers.  Also be sure to consider your local climate.  For areas with longer summers, you'll have more options of plants you can grow, plus a longer season in which to grow them.  However, gardeners living in cooler climates shouldn't discount the variety of cool weather vegetables they can cultivate such as spinach, peas, lettuce, potatoes, carrots, and beets.  You should also honestly ask yourself how much time and energy you'll want to put into your vegetable garden.  If you're someone who works long hours and you're tired at the end of the day, you may not want to spend an hour or two every summer evening weeding and caring for a large plot of land.  If this is the case, start on a small scale.  You can always plant a larger garden next year, if you want.

Next you'll want to obtain seeds and seed starting supplies.  Read each seed packet carefully to determine when to start the seeds.  If plants take 2 weeks for germination plus 4-6 weeks before they can be transplanted, and the last expected frost date in your area is May 15, then you should sow the seeds indoors around the last week of March.

Finding a good place to start your plants from seed will be very critical to their early growth and development.  An ideal location is a warm sunny window facing south or west.  If you don't have such a window, a small indoor greenhouse might be a good investment.  Indoor greenhouses can be as small as just a couple shelves that occupy only the top of a table or workbench, or they can be as large as a floor unit, standing four or five shelves high.  Small indoor greenhouses can usually be outfitted with heat lamps or grow lamps to encourage germination and rapid early growth of seedlings.

Before transplanting seedlings to the garden, be sure to map out where you're going to plant everything.  Pay attention to the space requirements of each vegetable, keeping in mind that some need extra space for air flow around the plant, while others need to be close together to promote pollination.  Also remember that you don't have to group all similar plants together.  If you have 5 or 6 tomato plants, for example, space them out around your garden, mixing them in with other types of vegetables.  Inter-planting crops can help discourage insect infestations and other pests.

Preparing for a vegetable garden requires time, patience, and a lot of pre-planning long before the weather even warms up.  These early steps may take time, but the effort you put in now will pay you back dividends over Vegetarian Capsules Manufacturers the summer in the form of a bumper crop of healthy produce.
[ Generalna ] 28 April, 2019 08:38
It's never too early to begin planning next summer's vegetable garden.  In fact, sales of greenhouses and seed starting supplies usually begin in late December and early January, and by the end of February, most retailers have a variety of seeds for sale on store shelves.  If you want to plant a vegetable garden this coming summer, some advance planning will ensure that you are able to get all the seeds you want before they sell out, and you'll be able to start them in time to have healthy young plants ready for transplant into your garden in early or late spring.

The first part of planning your vegetable garden is deciding what to grow.  How much space do you have for planting?  Someone who lives in the country and has a large plot of land will certainly need to do more advance planning than an apartment dweller with a small deck or veranda.  Remember that even if you're limited by space, there are many types of vegetables that grow well in patio containers.  Also be sure to consider your local climate.  For areas with longer summers, you'll have more options of plants you can grow, plus a longer season in which to grow them.  However, gardeners living in cooler climates shouldn't discount the variety of cool weather vegetables they can cultivate such as spinach, peas, lettuce, potatoes, carrots, and beets.  You should also honestly ask yourself how much time and energy you'll want to put into your vegetable garden.  If you're someone who works long hours and you're tired at the end of the day, you may not want to spend an hour or two every summer evening weeding and caring for a large plot of land.  If this is the case, start on a small scale.  You can always plant a larger garden next year, if you want.

Next you'll want to obtain seeds and seed starting supplies.  Read each seed packet carefully to determine when to start the seeds.  If plants take 2 weeks for germination plus 4-6 weeks before they can be transplanted, and the last expected frost date in your area is May 15, then you should sow the seeds indoors around the last week of March.

Finding a good place to start your plants from seed will be very critical to their early growth and development.  An ideal location is a warm sunny window facing south or west.  If you don't have such a window, a small indoor greenhouse might be a good investment.  Indoor greenhouses can be as small as just a couple shelves that occupy only the top of a table or workbench, or they can be as large as a floor unit, standing four or five shelves high.  Small indoor greenhouses can usually be outfitted with heat lamps or grow lamps to encourage germination and rapid early growth of seedlings.

Before transplanting seedlings to the garden, be sure to map out where you're going to plant everything.  Pay attention to the space requirements of each vegetable, keeping in mind that some need extra space for air flow around the plant, while others need to be close together to promote pollination.  Also remember that you don't have to group all similar plants together.  If you have 5 or 6 tomato plants, for example, space them out around your garden, mixing them in with other types of vegetables.  Inter-planting crops can help discourage insect infestations and other pests.

Preparing for a vegetable garden requires time, patience, and a lot of pre-planning long before the weather even warms up.  These early steps may take time, but the effort you put in now will pay you back dividends over Vegetarian Capsules Manufacturers the summer in the form of a bumper crop of healthy produce.
[ Generalna ] 28 April, 2019 08:38
It's never too early to begin planning next summer's vegetable garden.  In fact, sales of greenhouses and seed starting supplies usually begin in late December and early January, and by the end of February, most retailers have a variety of seeds for sale on store shelves.  If you want to plant a vegetable garden this coming summer, some advance planning will ensure that you are able to get all the seeds you want before they sell out, and you'll be able to start them in time to have healthy young plants ready for transplant into your garden in early or late spring.

The first part of planning your vegetable garden is deciding what to grow.  How much space do you have for planting?  Someone who lives in the country and has a large plot of land will certainly need to do more advance planning than an apartment dweller with a small deck or veranda.  Remember that even if you're limited by space, there are many types of vegetables that grow well in patio containers.  Also be sure to consider your local climate.  For areas with longer summers, you'll have more options of plants you can grow, plus a longer season in which to grow them.  However, gardeners living in cooler climates shouldn't discount the variety of cool weather vegetables they can cultivate such as spinach, peas, lettuce, potatoes, carrots, and beets.  You should also honestly ask yourself how much time and energy you'll want to put into your vegetable garden.  If you're someone who works long hours and you're tired at the end of the day, you may not want to spend an hour or two every summer evening weeding and caring for a large plot of land.  If this is the case, start on a small scale.  You can always plant a larger garden next year, if you want.

Next you'll want to obtain seeds and seed starting supplies.  Read each seed packet carefully to determine when to start the seeds.  If plants take 2 weeks for germination plus 4-6 weeks before they can be transplanted, and the last expected frost date in your area is May 15, then you should sow the seeds indoors around the last week of March.

Finding a good place to start your plants from seed will be very critical to their early growth and development.  An ideal location is a warm sunny window facing south or west.  If you don't have such a window, a small indoor greenhouse might be a good investment.  Indoor greenhouses can be as small as just a couple shelves that occupy only the top of a table or workbench, or they can be as large as a floor unit, standing four or five shelves high.  Small indoor greenhouses can usually be outfitted with heat lamps or grow lamps to encourage germination and rapid early growth of seedlings.

Before transplanting seedlings to the garden, be sure to map out where you're going to plant everything.  Pay attention to the space requirements of each vegetable, keeping in mind that some need extra space for air flow around the plant, while others need to be close together to promote pollination.  Also remember that you don't have to group all similar plants together.  If you have 5 or 6 tomato plants, for example, space them out around your garden, mixing them in with other types of vegetables.  Inter-planting crops can help discourage insect infestations and other pests.

Preparing for a vegetable garden requires time, patience, and a lot of pre-planning long before the weather even warms up.  These early steps may take time, but the effort you put in now will pay you back dividends over Vegetarian Capsules Manufacturers the summer in the form of a bumper crop of healthy produce.
[ Generalna ] 27 April, 2019 04:44
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